• arrow
    LOG IN 
    • Log in using an option below.
         
      Forgot password?
      Login with Facebook
      Sign in with Twitter

  • REGISTER
ABOUT US
Shop Contact Us Submit Videos Who Are We? Hall Of Fame Advertising With PG Games Archive
BEST GAMES
Best games on iPhone Best games on iPad Best games on Apple Watch Best games on Android
FREE STUFF
Best free games on iPhone Best free games on iPad Best free games on Apple Watch Best free games on Android Competitions
GAME SALES
iPhone game sales iPad game sales Apple Watch game sales Android game sales
UPDATED GAMES
Latest iPhone game updates Latest iPad game updates Latest Apple Watch game updates Latest Android game updates
NEW RELEASES
New iPhone games New iPad games New Apple Watch games New Android games
MORE PG SITES
PG.biz PG FRANCE PG GERMANY PG Game Guides PG GameHubs PG Connects
MORE SM SITES
AppSpy Free App Alliance 148 Apps Android Rundown iPhone Quality Index iPad Quality Index Android Quality Index Swipe Magazine Best App Ever Awards
PARTNERS
Metacritic
GameRankings
Pocket Gamer on NewsNow
GamesTracker
dx.net
UK Mobile Pages Directory
Skinflint Price Comparison
iPhone  header logo

Crimsonland HD


For: iPhone   Also on: iPad, Steam

You've got red on you

Product: Crimsonland HD | Publisher: 10tons | Format: iPhone | Genre: Action, Shooter | Players: 1 | Version: Europe | App version: 1.0.4
 
Crimsonland HD iPhone, thumbnail 1
As someone who's just recently moved house, I know a thing or two about decorating. And Crimsonland HD, an overhaul of a 10-year-old decorating simulator, gets it all wrong.

Its method of splashing red stuff around by blasting away at waves of monsters with a variety of firearms is highly inefficient, particularly as it usually results in the decorator's death.

Of course, if you choose to look at Crimsonland HD as a top-down shooter (weirdo), it's pretty good fun.

Paint the ground red

Played one of the squillion or so twin-stick shooters currently available on the App Store? Of course you have. Crimsonland HD plays just like those.

Its key differentiating factor over the also-rans is the gleefully icky, squishy feedback that comes from bullet/shell/ion pulse meeting critter.

As the name suggests, every kill leaves its mark on the battlefield. Come the end of the level (or your inevitable capitulation in Survival mode), it's like someone let Jackson Pollock loose in an abattoir.

This is gore in the excessively ludicrous, tongue-in-cheek, late '90s sense.

Splatterhouse


The controls are suitably chewy. There's a sense of weight to the right analogue stick aiming system that's initially off-putting. Inaccurate, even.

But once you're attuned to the game's way of doing things, you realise that this approach is actually very well judged, rewarding those who work the arenas to find little pockets of space where you can stand still and really line up a few consecutive kills.

Many of the weapons are inherently inaccurate or slow-firing, meaning that their effective range tends to be uncomfortably close.

IAPs explained
You can choose what you pay for the full Crimsonland HD experience: £2.99, £6.99, or £10.49.

There's no advantage to going for the full amount, so just pay what you think the game's worth.

An refreshingly un-pushy approach, this. It'll be interesting to see how it works out.
Still, a lack of variety to the action and environments mean that Crimsonland HD would remain fairly average if it weren't for its perk system.

Perks of the job

Other games have perk systems, of course, but here they're handled in beautifully haphazard style. In Survival mode (which really is how the game should be played), you'll be awarded the option of a new perk every now and then.

These can be fairly run of the mill, like the one that boosts your firing rate, or they can be completely out there like the one that gives you three consecutive perks options at the expense of 99 percent of your health.

It adds a welcome dose of unpredictably and vibrancy to a game that does tend to wear thin before too long.

Crimsonland HD is a rare, gristly piece of beef that leaves a mess and proves tiring to chew on, but there's no denying its intensely meaty flavour.
 
Crimsonland HD
Reviewer photo
Jon Mundy | 15 October 2014
A satisfyingly meaty twin stick shooter that spices up its repetitive blasting with weighty combat and a free-wheeling perk system
 
Have Your Say
POPULAR REVIEWS
RECENT COMMENTS LATEST NEWS
LATEST VIDEOS
VIDEO REVIEWS